The Latest

Apr 1, 2014

Luc Tuyman

Tacita Dean— Courtesy Frith Street Gallery, London
The Book End of Time, 2013, installation view at Frieze Art Fair in London, 2013 
Read more: Reporting from Frieze: Eight Exciting Discoveries at the Contemporary Art Fair - LightBox http://lightbox.time.com/2013/10/23/reporting-from-frieze-eight-exciting-discoveries-at-the-contemporary-art-fair/#ixzz2mbkAE9Qf
Dec 5, 2013

Tacita Dean— Courtesy Frith Street Gallery, London

The Book End of Time, 2013, installation view at Frieze Art Fair in London, 2013 

“without art, philosophy lacks sensitivity and without philosophy, art lacks thought.” Laruelle, The Concept of Non-­Photography
This kind of mutual distinction is part and parcel of the philosophical process. Art and philosophy are separated and reunited, then policed as conjoined but distinct. A strange logic indeed, yet for Laruelle the logic is evident in everything from Plato’s Republic to Deleuze and Guattari’s What is Philosophy?
Dec 2, 2013
Oct 11, 2013

Johanna Love

Scanner Dust

Oct 11, 2013

Steven Pippin

http://imageobjecttext.com/2012/01/26/life-through-a-very-small-hole/#more-418

There are quicker and easier ways to take pictures. It’s not as though cameras aren’t readily available in shops. For Steven Pippin though, the process of making a picture usually starts with the process of making a camera. In itself that’s not so unusual. There are probably countless art teachers out there who have encouraged students to make pinhole cameras. Usually such undertakings begin with a box of some sort, often a biscuit tin. But that would be way too easy for Pippin.

Among the many everyday objects Pippin has turned into cameras – bath, train toilet, wardrobe etc – the most ambitious in scale is probably the prefab bungalow in Clerkenwell used to make the picture shown above. As self-portraits go, it’s not the most detailed around but that’s hardly surprising given the eight hour exposure and the fact that it’s in negative (it was made directly onto sheets of photographic paper pinned up inside the building rather than on film, which doesn’t come in bungalow size).

Aug 8, 2013

Anselm Kiefer

 of a generation of young German painters dubbed Neo-Expressionists during the 1980s, Anselm Kiefer has explored German myth and history in his art since the early 1970s. Woodcut, the only printmaking technique Kiefer uses, has played a central role in his work. However, rather than creating conventional prints published in standard editions, he incorporates woodcuts into paintings, groups them together to create works that rival the grand scale of his paintings, or uses them in his many illustrated books. To date he has completed approximately one hundred works incorporating the woodcut technique. In 1970 Kiefer began to study with Joseph Beuys at the Academy of Art in Dnsseldorf, where, under Beuys’s influence, he embarked on a personal examination of the troubled legacy of Germany’s past. He incorporated a wide range of diverse materials into his work, including photographs, straw, tar, lead, sand, and dried plants, as well as woodcut, a technique with a long and distinguished history in German art. Richard Wagner’s opera cycle The Ring and the tragic fate of its protagonists Siegfried and Brunhilde form the backdrop for Grane. The heroic role of Brunhilde’s horse, Grane, is a recurring motif in Kiefer’s work. Here the horse is engulfed in the funeral pyre into which the heroine rides at a climactic moment in the opera. Kiefer’s book Der Rhein can be seen as his response to the German tradition of landscape painters such as Caspar David Friedrich and others of the Romantic period. It epitomizes his use of the book format as an evocative metaphor for the communication of collective knowledge and memory.

Aug 5, 2013

Vija Celmins Talks about herself and her works

“We have had a gut full of fast art and fast food, what we need more of is slow art, art that holds time as a vase holds water, art that grows out of modes of perception and making, whose skill and doggedness make you think and feel. Art that isn’t merely sensational, that
doesn’t get its message across in ten seconds, that isn’t falsely iconic
, that hooks onto something deep in our natures,in a word, art that is the very opposite of mass media.” ~ Robert Hughes

(The New Shock of the New [Documentary]
BBC Robert Hughes, 2004)

Aug 3, 2013
“if something can be contained
in writing the discursive structure of
words, that we trust it will have more legitimacy than other kinds of
information or ways of knowing” ~ Ann Hamilton
Aug 2, 2013
Aug 2, 2013

Vija Celmins

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From: http://www.c4gallery.com/artist/database/vija-celmins/vija-celmins.html

Vija Celmins:
Beyond Rendering

Apart from being an incredibly accomplished ‘technician’, which is perhaps MOST of the reason that attention is bestowed upon Vija Celmins, there is a tenacious - even obsessive quality seen in her works - at least in the aggregate.  And so, syntactically - they fascinate. That is to say that seeing a collection of her work over time is rewarding… to explore the variations in treatment, framing, subject matter and technique. And it is a fascinating exploration, a controlled one at that, into the psyche of an artist and a human being. This is perhaps the most powerful aspect of her work -and the aspect that you will RARELY hear being talked about.  This is where we discuss thematics.  There are several enduring themes running through her work which appear time an again - all loosely intimating a sense of mortality - the ocean(water)… the night sky… the spider web… disasters.  The universality of such existential tropes resonate soundly with all of us.

But it’s not even so simple. The degree to which craft is exercised embeds a layer of communication, a layer of intimacy - in her work which is all but absent in the conceptual musings of the last 20-30 years of efforts by our best artists.  She exposes us to a level of mastery and that is haunting that we wish not acknowledge nor discuss because it’s not convenient to the narrative of the ‘contemporary’. I think that Celmins’ work provides a reminder of the soulful aspect of art that is all too often missing these decades. It is a challlenge that needs to be answered.

Thoughts On My Art Work: 
Reference: 

Contemplations  of the Spiritual in Contemporary Art
Liverpool Cathedral,  10-I  I Sep 2010

“James  Elkins, reporting  on  the  scene  in  the  United States,  described  how  the  secular  art establishment, like  so many latter-day Borgias,  exercise  a  negative  power  of patronage by  refusing to allow new ar twith  religious  themes  into  leading periodicals and  galleries.”
“Both  religion  and  art  have rediscovered  a vocation  to inhabit this in-between  zone  and  to  interpret  its potentialities  to  the  wider  world.  If they will have the courage to put aside their mutual suspicions, then the  freedom  and  openness  of  this  threshold have  the  potential  to  transform  their relationships  with one  another and  to enrich  both  communities  and  others beyond.  This  conference  was  an encouraging step in that direction.”
 “ Harry  Lesser  argued  that  modernism and the spiritual  are  not inherently  exclusive,  but  that  modernism provides a potentially  fruitful opening for the  representation  of the spiritual. Like the movement of the Spirit in religion, modernism breaks away from the requirements  of  realism  and  the mimetic tradition and has an interest in what  is  moving  and  unfinished.  Jim Malone  revealed  the way in which the work  of  many  modernists  evokes  a contemplative  stillness  that  can  be  a great source of stimulation in the spiritual life. He pleaded  for the recognition on the part of art-critical  and theological commentators  of the spiritual value of these ‘secular’  work”

 Aims+objectives:
Using alternative mediums, cyanotype printing, scanner photography, projection on alternative photography, I wish emphasizes the interconnectedness of spirituality and art in postmodern culture. Printing alternative photos on dirty old white fabric. Found objects. Perhaps using photographic transfer on worn out surfaces. (recycling mediums, idea of beliefs building on top of one another, Joanna’s use of landscape, numerous possibiliies). Probably exploring the digital world by discarding all my artwork, and only keeping a digital copy of it. The idea of a floating intangible existence. Unseen weightlessness. Idea of a living in a third space. Using certain historical symbolism as a metanarrative of our postmodern world, I do not sought to particularly express a spiritual absolute, but to sum up the complexity of our existence and our struggle to grasp life of humanity’s ambition to outdo each intellectual claims throughout history. Art materialistic nature, undoing the spiritual heights our forefather has built, back into abyss, darkness. With a retraction of the metanarratives that govern a rapidly changing, increasingly globalized world, we become free to embrace diversity, innovation, freedom, and the paradoxical present in all its splendid ambiguity. Not everything is pinned down in a dichotomous universe; there arestill questions that remain simply questions, unanswered, perhaps unanswerable. Perhaps a juxtaposition of a inner spiritual sanctuary versus an external chaotic one in the world. Snitching of internal and external spirituality,that something in life goes beyond the here and now and the commitment to that something isolation and self-absorption but of self-transcendencetoward the ultimate value one perceives”
Most spiritual seekers dabble and experiment with an array of choices rather han make a permanent commitment to one set of teachings or beliefs. Spiritual seekers may find the church set on building an organization or an institution rather than promoting spirituality, which emphasizes the spiritual growth of the individual 
 
“We encounter spiritual issues every time we wonder where the
universe comes from, why we are here, or what happens when we die” (2001, p. 8). In
this instance, spirituality takes one to the larger picture, those philosophical questions that are asked by many at varying degrees and varying intensities.

The endless (meaningless) pursuit of knowledge? 
Random conclusion of symbols and frameworks of meaning that may result in disjunctions and eclecticism? Leading to The futility of philosophies, abandoning the idea that overarching myths, narratives, or concrete frameworks of knowledge can be found.
Beauty of fragmented contradictory philosophies interweaving through history.
Very Interpretative work, abstract pieces. Using abstract to express our plural world.  Role of the artist in the society: that the artist has become the philosopher of the postmoderner in contemporary society refers to a melding of eclectic and sometimes esoteric teachings from scriptural components, sacred texts, premodern belief systems, psychology, mysticism, secularized thought, and a host of other influences  “collage, bringing in meaning.” Our world today is a collage. By combining, melding, and synthesizing a number of belief systems and the teachings of mystics from many generations and cultures, Viola and his work reflect both the varied ingredients and the additive processes typical of postmodern art.
Viola attempts to convey the existence of something that is unpresentable without necessarily emphasizing images themselves, but rather what lies beneath and behind the images, the connotations of the images. Through the sublime feeling his work evokes, Viola uses his art to communicate his deepest thoughts, dreams, fears, processes, and epiphanies

Reference to Joanna Love’s work. 
Shifting perspective,  “malik suggests one major historical change to consider is that religious belief has been wrest away from its traditional strongholds of “institutions, religions, and cultures” and is now less about salvation and service than individuality and belonging. He argues that this shift is one consequence of a particular late-20th century erosion of faith in human-directed progress, which has ultimately lead to developments over the past two decades resulting in western societies having become “less secular without becoming more religious.”  (post modern: God is Dead. Existentialist) 
Context
Reader interprets the work, and reflects their own stand in the history of spiritual philosophy. French philosopher Jacques Derrida references the phenomenon of multiple interpretations when he suggests that the meaning does not reside in the text, or in this case the artwork, but in the reading and writing of the text (Derrida and Attridge, 1992). When the text or artwork is “read” in different contexts it is given new meanings that are socially embedded within ideological systems (Hodder, 2000). The “reader” is in essence invited to become a “full and equal partner in the meaning-making process,”
 Bill viola on Art as spiritual. Bill Viola writes: I believe in the human capacity for survival, against all odds—that life will always find a way to go on, and that within ourselves we will always discover the will and ability to rise up again to overcome obstacles, to transform and transcend who we are. This is why I believe in the power of art, and especially media art, tospeak across borders and barriers, transcending language, culture, socio-political differences, and even space and time, to become a universal expression andreflection of mankind (2007, p. 11)
 On iconoclasm “the biblical distinction between the one true God and false gds or idols is still potent, as is the resulting monotheistic suspicion towards images, which are always potentially idols. In his text in this reader, Whats wrong with images? Assmann provides a historical account of the thelogical and politica meanings of the religious prohibition on images, and in so doing explores the specific understanding of images in both monolatry and monotheism.
On the gap that art/religion has to fill in our lives but religion still holds more weight than the shifting art perspective.  “Further Groys weighs in on how religion and art might substitute for the lack of horizon we are confronted with today, claiming that unlike religion, art is always “material and materialistic,” which is an essential condition of art’s potential to fulfill its emancipatory role in society.
 “How much (or, more to the point, how little) irony is still left in art’s obsessive exploration of New Age phenomena at this point in time? Will contemporary art’s stubborn drive towards a re-enchantment of the world plunge us back into dark abyss of superstition from which the men and women of the Enlightenment took such great pains to rescue us, bathing its bathetic depths in the light of earthly knowledge?
 ”a radical identification, that is, of art’s secular thought with a defiant, ruthless materialism, with scepsis and godlessness-a refusal of all transendence. May all that is post secular melt back into air.”
4: Methodology
Attention to and adequate documentation of this phenomenon is essential to understanding and encouraging contemporary creative processes and spiritual explorations in all their guises.
 My body as a holy temply.
My spiritualism as freedom to life. 
 “In the 19th century exploration was geographic. Journeys were made into impassable jungles or the ice deserts of the Artic in an attempt to map the last “white” spots on the globe. But in the 20th century this notion of the ‘unknown’ changed. Exploration turned inward. The new realms to be explored were to molecule (Niels Bohr), the unconcscious (Sigmund Freud), language (Gertrude Stein) or the outskirts of the mind (Henri Michaux) by Joachim Koester
 
May 7, 2012

Thoughts On My Art Work: 

Reference: 

Contemplations  of the Spiritual in Contemporary Art

Liverpool Cathedral,  10-I  I Sep 2010

“James  Elkins, reporting  on  the  scene  in  the  United States,  described  how  the  secular  art establishment, like  so many latter-day Borgias,  exercise  a  negative  power  of patronage by  refusing to allow new ar twith  religious  themes  into  leading periodicals and  galleries.”

“Both  religion  and  art  have rediscovered  a vocation  to inhabit this in-between  zone  and  to  interpret  its potentialities  to  the  wider  world.  If they will have the courage to put aside their mutual suspicions, then the  freedom  and  openness  of  this  threshold have  the  potential  to  transform  their relationships  with one  another and  to enrich  both  communities  and  others beyond.  This  conference  was  an encouraging step in that direction.”

 “ Harry  Lesser  argued  that  modernism and the spiritual  are  not inherently  exclusive,  but  that  modernism provides a potentially  fruitful opening for the  representation  of the spiritual. Like the movement of the Spirit in religion, modernism breaks away from the requirements  of  realism  and  the mimetic tradition and has an interest in what  is  moving  and  unfinished.  Jim Malone  revealed  the way in which the work  of  many  modernists  evokes  a contemplative  stillness  that  can  be  a great source of stimulation in the spiritual life. He pleaded  for the recognition on the part of art-critical  and theological commentators  of the spiritual value of these ‘secular’  work”

 Aims+objectives:

Using alternative mediums, cyanotype printing, scanner photography, projection on alternative photography, I wish emphasizes the interconnectedness of spirituality and art in postmodern culture. Printing alternative photos on dirty old white fabric. Found objects. Perhaps using photographic transfer on worn out surfaces. (recycling mediums, idea of beliefs building on top of one another, Joanna’s use of landscape, numerous possibiliies). Probably exploring the digital world by discarding all my artwork, and only keeping a digital copy of it. The idea of a floating intangible existence. Unseen weightlessness. Idea of a living in a third space. Using certain historical symbolism as a metanarrative of our postmodern world, I do not sought to particularly express a spiritual absolute, but to sum up the complexity of our existence and our struggle to grasp life of humanity’s ambition to outdo each intellectual claims throughout history. Art materialistic nature, undoing the spiritual heights our forefather has built, back into abyss, darkness. With a retraction of the metanarratives that govern a rapidly changing, increasingly globalized world, we become free to embrace diversity, innovation, freedom, and the paradoxical present in all its splendid ambiguity. Not everything is pinned down in a dichotomous universe; there arestill questions that remain simply questions, unanswered, perhaps unanswerable. Perhaps a juxtaposition of a inner spiritual sanctuary versus an external chaotic one in the world. Snitching of internal and external spirituality,that something in life goes beyond the here and now and the commitment to that something isolation and self-absorption but of self-transcendencetoward the ultimate value one perceives”

Most spiritual seekers dabble and experiment with an array of choices rather han make a permanent commitment to one set of teachings or beliefs. Spiritual seekers may find the church set on building an organization or an institution rather than promoting spirituality, which emphasizes the spiritual growth of the individual 

 

“We encounter spiritual issues every time we wonder where the

universe comes from, why we are here, or what happens when we die” (2001, p. 8). In

this instance, spirituality takes one to the larger picture, those philosophical questions that are asked by many at varying degrees and varying intensities.

The endless (meaningless) pursuit of knowledge?

Random conclusion of symbols and frameworks of meaning that may result in disjunctions and eclecticism? Leading to The futility of philosophies, abandoning the idea that overarching myths, narratives, or concrete frameworks of knowledge can be found.

Beauty of fragmented contradictory philosophies interweaving through history.

Very Interpretative work, abstract pieces. Using abstract to express our plural world.  Role of the artist in the society: that the artist has become the philosopher of the postmoderner in contemporary society refers to a melding of eclectic and sometimes esoteric teachings from scriptural components, sacred texts, premodern belief systems, psychology, mysticism, secularized thought, and a host of other influences  “collage, bringing in meaning.” Our world today is a collage. By combining, melding, and synthesizing a number of belief systems and the teachings of mystics from many generations and cultures, Viola and his work reflect both the varied ingredients and the additive processes typical of postmodern art.

Viola attempts to convey the existence of something that is unpresentable without necessarily emphasizing images themselves, but rather what lies beneath and behind the images, the connotations of the images. Through the sublime feeling his work evokes, Viola uses his art to communicate his deepest thoughts, dreams, fears, processes, and epiphanies

Reference to Joanna Love’s work.

Shifting perspective,  “malik suggests one major historical change to consider is that religious belief has been wrest away from its traditional strongholds of “institutions, religions, and cultures” and is now less about salvation and service than individuality and belonging. He argues that this shift is one consequence of a particular late-20th century erosion of faith in human-directed progress, which has ultimately lead to developments over the past two decades resulting in western societies having become “less secular without becoming more religious.”  (post modern: God is Dead. Existentialist)

Context

Reader interprets the work, and reflects their own stand in the history of spiritual philosophy. French philosopher Jacques Derrida references the phenomenon of multiple interpretations when he suggests that the meaning does not reside in the text, or in this case the artwork, but in the reading and writing of the text (Derrida and Attridge, 1992). When the text or artwork is “read” in different contexts it is given new meanings that are socially embedded within ideological systems (Hodder, 2000). The “reader” is in essence invited to become a “full and equal partner in the meaning-making process,”

 Bill viola on Art as spiritual. Bill Viola writes: I believe in the human capacity for survival, against all odds—that life will always find a way to go on, and that within ourselves we will always discover the will and ability to rise up again to overcome obstacles, to transform and transcend who we are. This is why I believe in the power of art, and especially media art, tospeak across borders and barriers, transcending language, culture, socio-political differences, and even space and time, to become a universal expression andreflection of mankind (2007, p. 11)

 On iconoclasm “the biblical distinction between the one true God and false gds or idols is still potent, as is the resulting monotheistic suspicion towards images, which are always potentially idols. In his text in this reader, Whats wrong with images? Assmann provides a historical account of the thelogical and politica meanings of the religious prohibition on images, and in so doing explores the specific understanding of images in both monolatry and monotheism.

On the gap that art/religion has to fill in our lives but religion still holds more weight than the shifting art perspective.  “Further Groys weighs in on how religion and art might substitute for the lack of horizon we are confronted with today, claiming that unlike religion, art is always “material and materialistic,” which is an essential condition of art’s potential to fulfill its emancipatory role in society.

 “How much (or, more to the point, how little) irony is still left in art’s obsessive exploration of New Age phenomena at this point in time? Will contemporary art’s stubborn drive towards a re-enchantment of the world plunge us back into dark abyss of superstition from which the men and women of the Enlightenment took such great pains to rescue us, bathing its bathetic depths in the light of earthly knowledge?

 ”a radical identification, that is, of art’s secular thought with a defiant, ruthless materialism, with scepsis and godlessness-a refusal of all transendence. May all that is post secular melt back into air.”

4: Methodology

Attention to and adequate documentation of this phenomenon is essential to understanding and encouraging contemporary creative processes and spiritual explorations in all their guises.

 My body as a holy temply.

My spiritualism as freedom to life.

 “In the 19th century exploration was geographic. Journeys were made into impassable jungles or the ice deserts of the Artic in an attempt to map the last “white” spots on the globe. But in the 20th century this notion of the ‘unknown’ changed. Exploration turned inward. The new realms to be explored were to molecule (Niels Bohr), the unconcscious (Sigmund Freud), language (Gertrude Stein) or the outskirts of the mind (Henri Michaux) by Joachim Koester

 

MA Fine Art Proposal 
Click Here To Download: 
May 7, 2012

MA Fine Art Proposal 

Click Here To Download: 

Essay For MA Fine Art 
Click To Go: Link To Essay: 
May 7, 2012

Essay For MA Fine Art 

Click To Go: Link To Essay: 




Cover: Toned Silver Print on Mulberry Paper 



ATL FILM STILL 2
 
YEAR: 1996-2007
 
SIZE: 60”X80”
MEDIUM: LAMBDA DIGITAL C - PRINT MOUNTED ON ALUMINUM



BLOT OUT THE SUN 6
 
YEAR: 1998-2007
 
SIZE: 66”X108”

MEDIUM: ARCHIVAL INKJET PRINTS WITH ENCAUSTIC AND WAX

Mike & Doug Starn
Artist 








Since the 1980s, Mike and Doug Starn’s conceptual approach to photography, and use of unorthodox techniques, has broadened notions of what is accepted as a photograph. In a signature manipulation of materials and form, the twin brothers apply innovative printing techniques, and a vast array of materials including transparency film, plexiglass, layered fused glass panels, gilded colored carbon prints, scotch tape, wax and pushpins, to create, and intensify, their metaphorical landscapes. I am interested to reference this siblings because of their similar techniques in creating alternative prints on alternative surfaces. With their development of their technique i can than learn how to develop my craft as well, and explore more ways of expressing my spiritual themes beyond my own imagination. With the theme of light as a central component of their work, the brothers explore the physical and philosophical interconnections between subjects such as leaves, trees, snowflakes, and religious icons, with human memory, perception and thought. Working collaboratively in photography since the age of thirteen, their innovative techniques, and unique combination of sculpture, painting, and video, have defied categorization, and earned them a position of eminence within the history of art.


Born in New Jersey, 1961, Mike and Doug Starn attended The School of The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. Their work has been widely exhibited throughout the world, and represented in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art, Art Institute of Chicago, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among many others. They live and work in Brooklyn, New York.
May 7, 2012

Cover: Toned Silver Print on Mulberry Paper 

ATL FILM STILL 2

 

YEAR: 1996-2007

 

SIZE: 60”X80”
MEDIUM: LAMBDA DIGITAL C - PRINT MOUNTED ON ALUMINUM
BLOT OUT THE SUN 6
 
YEAR: 1998-2007
 
SIZE: 66”X108”
MEDIUM: ARCHIVAL INKJET PRINTS WITH ENCAUSTIC AND WAX

Mike & Doug Starn

Artist 

Since the 1980s, Mike and Doug Starn’s conceptual approach to photography, and use of unorthodox techniques, has broadened notions of what is accepted as a photograph. In a signature manipulation of materials and form, the twin brothers apply innovative printing techniques, and a vast array of materials including transparency film, plexiglass, layered fused glass panels, gilded colored carbon prints, scotch tape, wax and pushpins, to create, and intensify, their metaphorical landscapes. I am interested to reference this siblings because of their similar techniques in creating alternative prints on alternative surfaces. With their development of their technique i can than learn how to develop my craft as well, and explore more ways of expressing my spiritual themes beyond my own imagination. With the theme of light as a central component of their work, the brothers explore the physical and philosophical interconnections between subjects such as leaves, trees, snowflakes, and religious icons, with human memory, perception and thought. Working collaboratively in photography since the age of thirteen, their innovative techniques, and unique combination of sculpture, painting, and video, have defied categorization, and earned them a position of eminence within the history of art.

Born in New Jersey, 1961, Mike and Doug Starn attended The School of The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. Their work has been widely exhibited throughout the world, and represented in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art, Art Institute of Chicago, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among many others. They live and work in Brooklyn, New York.